Home

Volunteers

Membership &
Contributions
Programs, Tours &
Services
Special Events

Madison Awards and Designations 

Quotes about Madison
Links to other Madison/Jefferson County sites

Historic Properties of
Historic Madison Inc

Jeremiah Sullivan House
Dr. Hutchings Office & Hospital
Costigan House
Schroeder Saddletree Factory Museum
Windle Auditorium
St. Michael the Archangel Church 
A.M.E. Church
Talbott-Hyatt  Garden

©Historic Madison, Inc
500 West  St.
Madison, IN 47250
812-265-2967
E-Mail us!
hmi@historicmadisoninc.com

 

Judge Jeremiah Sullivan House
304 West Second Street
Madison National Register District
Madison, Indiana

The Jeremiah Sullivan House located at 304 West Second in the Madison, Indiana Historic District is a fine example of Federal style architecture. Built for the Jeremiah Sullivan family in 1818, the house is considered Madison’s first mansion. The two-story brick dwelling exhibits fine delicate tapered reeded columns between the entrance door and sidelights, and an elliptical fanlight above.
 

The interior is furnished in period furnishings. The basement kitchen with brick floor and stone fireplace is furnished in period and demonstrates a typical Madison kitchen of the time. On the first floor is a restored federal serving kitchen, The rear yard contains an interpretation of a period bake oven and smokehouse.

Virginia-born Sullivan came to Madison in 1816 to practice law. He built his home in 1818 and from this base went on to carve an esteemed career as state legislator, state supreme court judge and county judge, Presbyterian elder, and Mason. He helped found nearby Hanover College and the Indiana Historical Society. Jeremiah Sullivan’s public career was immediately successful. Governor Jennings quickly appointed him prosecuting attorney in Madison and within three years of his arrival he was elected a member of the state legislature. While in the Legislature, it was he who gave Indianapolis its name. He later was judge of the Supreme Court of Indiana from 1836-1846 and in 1869 a criminal court was created for Jefferson County and he was appointed judge.

The museum is open to the public mid April through October. Admission is charged. The property is one of 17 historic properties owned and operated by Historic Madison, Inc. a non-profit organization dedicated to education, promotion, and assistance in preservation and restoration of historic resources which protect our heritage and enhance the quality of life in Madison, Indiana. For additional information contact: Historic Madison, Inc. 500 West Street, Madison, Indiana 812-265-2967. hmi@historicmadisoninc.com